Where’s the Fun?

Where’s the Fun?

The concept of “fun” carries with it implications of entertainment, enjoyment, light-heartedness, and pleasure.  These are very saleable concepts, but when we require our physical activities to be “fun,” we run the risk of overlooking some valuable traits that...
Separating steps 2 and 3 in the deadlift

Separating steps 2 and 3 in the deadlift

Deadlifting is one of the best things you can do for your back. Subjecting your back to a controlled stress that forces it to adapt and become stronger is good for your longevity and overall quality of life. I am frequently amazed by how quickly routine back pain improves in clients after just a few weeks of barbell training – and deadlifting is central to this improvement.

One common mistake made by novice lifters, even some who are generally attentive to detail, is to combine steps 2 and 3. Instead of bending over at the hips and grabbing the bar (step 2), and then as a separate step bending their knees to establish the correct shin angle (step 3), lifters may both bend over and bend their knees simultaneously.

Almost always, this will result in an incorrect start position, with hips too low, the bar forward of the mid-foot, and the scapulae behind the bar rather than directly over it.

Racking and unracking the bar

Racking and unracking the bar

The importance of properly unracking and racking the barbell during the squat is frequently overlooked. This is because lifters often do not feel the need to take it seriously when they are just beginning a linear progression and the weights are still light.

However, poorly unracking the barbell will at best rob you of the energy and strength you need to complete your working weight and at worst lead to a serious injury. Setting up good habits about racking and unracking the barbell will set you up to be successful and safe.

In this video, we will cover how to properly unrack and rack the barbell and show some common mistakes.

Let’s Destroy the Word “Bulky”

Let’s Destroy the Word “Bulky”

We are surrounded by messaging that tells women to be smaller, quieter, softer, thinner, leaner – to be less.  This is so glaringly obvious that it feels gratuitous to mention. We in the barbell community sometimes think we stand in opposition to these ideas, that we offer an alternative to the mainstream image of what a woman should be. I think we often fail at that, and even sometimes unwittingly reinforce those very ideals.

Buying a belt

Buying a belt

A weightlifting belt is an essential piece of equipment!

A belt used properly will add stability and safety to the spine and torso of the lifter. It is common gym mythology that a lifting belt allows the lifters core to disengage but this could not be further from the truth. The belt actually increases the lifters ability to contract the musculature of the core by providing tactile feedback around the waist.

Macro Calculator

Macro Calculator

Recovery is a critical aspect of strength training. If you don’t recover from your training, you don’t adapt, and you don’t get stronger.

And at the heart of recovery is nutrition. You need to eat enough calories, and you need to eat the right things.

If you are serious about your training, it is probably a good idea for you to track and measure what you eat.

But tracking and measuring is not useful if you don’t know what your goals are.

To that end, we’ve put together a macro calculator for you.

Equipment Guide – Shoes

Equipment Guide – Shoes

Ordering a weighlifting shoe can be confusing.  You can’t go to a brick and mortar store and try a pair on.  Even if you could, you would want to get under a load and squat to really know what would work best for you.  I’ve tried to identify which shoes tend to be...
Essential Equipment – Shoes

Essential Equipment – Shoes

“Shoes are the only piece of personal equipment that you really need to own.” Starting Strength: Basic  Barbell Training by Mark Rippetoe. Why do people think shoes are unimportant, or decide to wait to buy weightlifting shoes until they are lifting more? What makes...
Training log 101

Training log 101

When it comes to getting stronger your training log is an essential piece of equipment.

Keeping a complete and thorough training log means you will progress faster, have more fun and be more aware of how your body adapts and responds. Your training log provides important data that allows you or your coach to make smart and effective programming choices. Seeing your progress on paper is very rewarding and motivating.

In this video, I discuss how to make the most of your training log and show an example log book.

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