Calculating your warmup sets

Calculating your warmup sets

Warmup sets are an important part of your training routine. Properly executed, warmup sets effectively prepare you to perform your heavy work sets to the best of your ability.

For new lifters in particular, how to approach one’s warmup sets — how many of them to perform, and at what weight — can be a subject of conclusion. This guide will give you some guiding principles and a couple specific methods to approach your warmup sets.

Recovery Picnic

Recovery Picnic

If you want to get stronger, you have to lift heavy weights. You also have to eat and rest!

Bay Strength lifters are invited to get together for a Recovery Picnic / potluck BBQ in Tilden Park. We’ll cook some good food and have a good time together.

Deadlift Clinic

Deadlift Clinic

Learn how to deadlift and build a strong back in our two hour deadlift clinic with Starting Strength Coaches Kelly Bryant and Gwyn Brookes.  We will cover basic physics and anatomy and then break up into groups to learn the lift.  Come and learn, or refine your knowledge!  The session will end with some tips on how to video your lifts and spot common errors, and a Q&A.

Unracking and racking the bench press

Unracking and racking the bench press

The bench press is a great exercise to build upper body strength, and for many people it’s their favorite lift. However, an extra degree of safety and attention is required of the bench press. The bench press is the only lift that can actually kill you. One of the most vulnerable parts of the deadlift is during the unracking and racking process. This video details the proper steps to safely and efficiently unrack and rock the barbell during the bench press.

Power in Action

Power in Action

Strength training has the potential to be a radical act for everyone, and especially for women. We in the strength community are committed to getting anyone and everyone under the bar. We have experienced its transformative power, and we see the results in our clients...
Where’s the Fun?

Where’s the Fun?

The concept of “fun” carries with it implications of entertainment, enjoyment, light-heartedness, and pleasure.  These are very saleable concepts, but when we require our physical activities to be “fun,” we run the risk of overlooking some valuable traits that...
Separating steps 2 and 3 in the deadlift

Separating steps 2 and 3 in the deadlift

Deadlifting is one of the best things you can do for your back. Subjecting your back to a controlled stress that forces it to adapt and become stronger is good for your longevity and overall quality of life. I am frequently amazed by how quickly routine back pain improves in clients after just a few weeks of barbell training – and deadlifting is central to this improvement.

One common mistake made by novice lifters, even some who are generally attentive to detail, is to combine steps 2 and 3. Instead of bending over at the hips and grabbing the bar (step 2), and then as a separate step bending their knees to establish the correct shin angle (step 3), lifters may both bend over and bend their knees simultaneously.

Almost always, this will result in an incorrect start position, with hips too low, the bar forward of the mid-foot, and the scapulae behind the bar rather than directly over it.

Racking and unracking the bar

Racking and unracking the bar

The importance of properly unracking and racking the barbell during the squat is frequently overlooked. This is because lifters often do not feel the need to take it seriously when they are just beginning a linear progression and the weights are still light.

However, poorly unracking the barbell will at best rob you of the energy and strength you need to complete your working weight and at worst lead to a serious injury. Setting up good habits about racking and unracking the barbell will set you up to be successful and safe.

In this video, we will cover how to properly unrack and rack the barbell and show some common mistakes.

Let’s Destroy the Word “Bulky”

Let’s Destroy the Word “Bulky”

We are surrounded by messaging that tells women to be smaller, quieter, softer, thinner, leaner – to be less.  This is so glaringly obvious that it feels gratuitous to mention. We in the barbell community sometimes think we stand in opposition to these ideas, that we offer an alternative to the mainstream image of what a woman should be. I think we often fail at that, and even sometimes unwittingly reinforce those very ideals.

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